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Comparison of School Aid Proposals - ASBO, Executive, Assembly, and Senate

The Senate and Assembly released their one house budgets this week.  A comparison of their proposals, the Executive Budget and NYSASBO’s  can be found here.

The Assembly proposes a $1.8 billion increase and the Senate proposes a $1.2 billion increase in school aid.  The Senate and Assembly both reject the Executive Budget’s proposal to eliminate the phase-in of the Foundation Aid formula.

The Assembly includes changes to the tax cap that were passed two years ago but never implemented by the Dept. of Tax and Finance that would have allowed exclusion for the district share of BOCES capital projects and included PILOT’s in tax base growth factor.

The Senate proposal included several of NYSASBO’s Legislative Priorities dealing with reducing the frequency of internal audits, eliminating duplicative fingerprinting of school bus drivers, using PYA to pay for state aid recoveries, and reimbursing districts in current year for high cost special education students.

The next step in the budget process is for joint legislative budget committees to meet to discuss and agree on spending targets for each area of the budget (i.e. education, health, transportation).  These should be scheduled starting next week.   A major stumbling block in finalizing a budget on time will be the Senate’s rejection of the continuation of the millionaire’s tax which the Governor and Assembly believe is necessary to fund proposed school aid increases.

 

Item NYSASBO  Executive Budget Proposal  Assembly One House Proposal  Senate One House Proposal 
Overall Increase $2.1 billion $961 million $1.8 billion ($887 million increase over executive) $1.2 billion ($239 million increase over executive)
Overall Foundation Aid Approach $3.8 billion over the next three years ($1.2 billion a year) for full phase in (uses data prior to 11/15/16) $428 million (including $50 million set-aside for Community Schools). The proposal directs more than 80 percent of the increase to high need school districts but eliminates the phase in to the fully funded formula. $4.3 billion over the next four years including $1.4
billion in 2017‐18.
$906.3 million including $125 million in Community schools funding and $20.5 million in Engligh Language Learner funding. Rejects the Governor's proposal to remove the calculation of the total Foundation aid Phase-in from the Foundation aid formula.
Foundation Formula Components Improve equity with better measures of wealth and poverty by using Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates, Direct Certification data and eliminating the .65 floor on income wealth in determining local effort Improve equity with better measures of wealth and poverty by using Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates, Direct Certification data and eliminating the .65 floor on income wealth in determining local effort Improve equity with better measures of wealth and poverty by using Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates  and eliminating the .65 floor on income wealth in determining local effort.  Provides for a 'selected poverty rate' of the better of 2000 Census poverty or the three-year average of Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates Utilizes direct certification data to improve the measurement of student poverty. 
Property Tax Cap Implement the BOCES capital cost exclusion and include properties under PILOT agreements in the tax base growth factor Not mentioned. Requires the Commissioner of Tax and Finance to promulgate regulations
excluding PILOTS and BOCES capital from the tax cap, and establishes a minimum tax
cap of zero percent, in order to prevent negative tax caps.
Makes the current property tax cap permanent. 
Career and Technical Education $76 million over three years ($25.4 million each year) includes enhanced BOCES Aid for CTE pathway programs, Enhanced and expanded aid for Big Five and Non Component school districts $5.3 million to create up to 10 new early college high schools focused on technology training, particularly computer science. $2 million to expand the master teacher program to designate an additional 115 computer science teachers statewide.

Increases funding for Career and Technical Education (CTE) by $25 million statewide, phases-in reimbursement for ninth graders in Special Services Aid and increases reimbursement for BOCES teacher salaries from $30,000 to $52,000 in BOCES Aid over four years.

 

Increases the aidable salary for staff providing career and technical education services through BOCES to $34,000 for the 2017-18 school year and $50,000 by 2022. 
Universal Pre-K No proposal Consolidates existing part-day and full-day pre-k programs into a single program funded at $416 million. Provides $5 million to expand pre-k in high need school districts. Modifies the executive proposal to consolidate Full-Day and Expanded Half-Day Prekindergarten grant program into Universal Prekindergarten within School Aid by making technical changes to ensure that districts do not lose funding. The total consolidated Universal Prekindergarten funding within School Aid would be $416 million. Consolidates existing part-day and full-day pre-k programs into a single program. Provides $5 million in new competitive grants for three year olds.
ELL Education $100 million per year until the Foundation Aid formula is fully phased in ELLs are included as a factor in determining district eligibility for a Community Schools Aid increase. Provides $15 milion for grants for school districts with growing numbers of English language learners to improve graduation results.  ELLs are included as a factor in determining district eligibility for a Community Schools Aid increase.
Professional Development No proposal Allow districts that adopt free, open-source online textbooks to use savings from textbook budget for professional development. Rejects the Executive proposal to allow schools to use Textbook Aid for professional development in certain circumstances.  Allow districts that adopt free, open-source online textbooks to use savings from textbook budget for professional development.
Prior Year Adjustments $321 million over the next three years ($107 million a year) to fully pay for all prior year adjustments Not mentioned Not mentioned Allows prior year adjustments to be applied toward future state aid recoveries
Expense-based aids Full funding of expense based aids $333 million reimbursement for expense-based aids Includes full reimbursement for expense-based aids including rejecting the executive's freeze of data (a $38 million increase)  Includes full reimbursement for expense-based aids  funded at $296.4 million rejects executives freeze of aid claims. 
Child Nutrition Reibursement $75 million over three years ($25 million each year) $500,000 for farm-to-school programs and expand education about healthy food. Not mentioned Includes $300,000 for North Country Farm to school programs. Increases school districts ability to purchase produce directly from local farms from $25,000 to $100,000
Save Harmless Holds districts harmless against loss ($253 million) Holds districts harmless against loss and provides a wealth adjusted increase up to one percent that benefits 170/250 school districts on save harmless Holds districts harmless against loss except that base year amounts for foundation aid will exclude community school setaside amounts and community schools aid will be provided as a separate category Holds districts harmless against loss.
Mandate Relief Recommends various cost saving measures like shared bus routes, reducing internal audit requirements and eliminating duplicative fingerprinting of bus drivers. See legislative priorities here.  Allows a waiver process to allow school districts, BOCES and approved private schools to seek waivers to special education requirements that go beyond federal requirements. Other mandate relief is not mentioned NRejects executive proposal allowing school districts and others  to seek waivers to special education requirements that go beyond federal requirements. Allows a waiver process to allow school districts, BOCES and approved private schools to seek waivers to special education requirements that go beyond federal requirements. Eliminates duplicative fingerprinting of bus drivers, reduces internal audits to once every five years and districts with less than 5,000 students would be exempt, accelerates state aid payments to the current year for special education students that enroll in school after the school year starts
Expanded After-School Care Not mentioned $35 million to create an additional 22,000 slots for after-school care in high need cities. Not mentioned Rejects $35 million to create additional after school care slots

 

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