U.S. Communities

The Gold Standard in Public Procurement

As those responsible for procurement know all too well, the task of balancing budget dollars and needs is challenging at best. To help address this challenge, utilizing a cooperative purchasing program has long been an established best practice. With recent legislation changes, the opportunity to leverage the buying power of cooperative contracts is available to schools throughout New York.

Most purchasing cooperatives deliver value by aggregating the purchasing power of public agencies to lower costs and increase services. Using a cooperative contract can also save time by eliminating the need to go through a lengthy solicitation process. The very best cooperatives, however, offer more.

The U.S. Communities Government Purchasing Alliance partners with public agencies to find solutions that benefit procurement professionals — including professionals responsible for purchasing for housing authorities. Simply put, U.S. Communities was founded by public agencies for public agencies.

U.S. Communities is the only purchasing cooperative founded and co-owned by four distinguished national sponsors: the National Association of Counties (NACo), the National League of Cities (NLC), the U.S. Conference of Mayors (USCM) and the Association of School Business Officials International (ASBO). In addition, over 90 state associations, including the New York State Association of School Business Officials, show their support for the U.S. Communities program with sponsorship.

The founding mission is to provide participating agencies access to competitively solicited contracts with national suppliers offering a broad line of top-quality products and services. There are no fees to participate and no purchasing minimums, allowing maximum flexibility for participants.

Each supplier commits to provide their most competitive government pricing to all participating agencies. Regularly scheduled internal and third-party audits ensure compliance with contract pricing, terms and conditions, while benchmarking analyses evaluate the overall value. Contracts are also reviewed quarterly by the Lead Public Agency, and all documents pertaining to contract solicitations are publicly posted on the U.S. Communities website for complete transparency.

U.S. Communities goes beyond providing outstanding contracts. They work with their supplier partners to offer comprehensive business solutions that help recreation and park professionals maximize cost-control while also improving operational efficiencies and performance. Since its founding in 1991, U.S. Communities has generated millions of dollars in savings for participating agencies.

The U.S. Communities Cooperative Purchasing Alliance truly is the gold standard when it comes to honest and effective public procurement, as well as partnerships dedicated to providing best-in-class procurement solutions. With over 500 new registrations each month, the continued rapid growth is testament to the program’s record of integrity and unparalleled value.

U.S. Communities can help support your purchasing needs. For more information on piggybacking in New York or the specific U.S. Communities contract solutions, visit www.uscommunities.org/ny or contact the Northeast Program Manager, Zac Adams at zadams@uscommunities.org.

See the U.S. Communities brochure to learn more.

 


Latest News: 

U.S. Communities is the first NIGP Accredited Cooperative!
Click here to view the award and learn about NAC Accreditation.

Office of the State Comptroller: New “Piggybacking” Law - Exception to Competitive Bidding (Updated)
Click here to view the document.

U.S. Communities releases a sample Agency Resolution form to simplify getting started with cooperative purchasing
Click here to download the document.

U.S. Communities launches contract for travel services and solutions with HotelPlanner
Click here to learn more (pdf). 
Click here to register for a webinar for more information. 

Article: Co-op contract saves money, improves utility’s business

Originally plublished in American City & County magazine
 


 

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